Professor

2017. Race and Inequality; University of New Mexico

As an upper division undergraduate course, this class is structured as a preparation for graduate level coursework examining the sociology of race, ethnicity, and inequality.  This course is structured in a seminar format that will introduce students to core theories, concepts, and debates in the sociology of race, ethnicity, and inequality in the U.S. and around the world.  In addition to covering core scholarly works, this class will also engage current events and social movements (e.g. Black Lives Matter, Standing Rock DAPL Protests).

There are two primary aims for this course. First, students who successfully complete the course will understand race and ethnicity as mutable, or changeable, social constructs that are linked to society-wide inequalities through interpersonal, institutional, and structural forms of racism. Race, ethnicity, and inequality have been and are constructed through historic and contemporary struggles over economic resources, political power, and cultural identity. Second, students who successfully complete this course will understand the close relationship between race and inequality as de-constructible. From everyday acts of resistance to big-picture public policy changes, the unequal effects of race can be un-made. 

Graduate Instructor

2015-2016. Inequality and Urban Life; Rice University.

We studied urban development and the lives of city-dwellers. We paid particular attention to the ways in which cities generate race, class, and gender inequality, and how these are experienced by a variety of city stakeholders. We did so not only through readings and discussion, but also by weekly time spent in local neighborhoods. We explored issues of justice and human capabilities.

Through this course, students 1) cultivated an understanding of urban systems of inequality; 2) learned about wealth and poverty creation and why poverty always exists; 3) gained an understanding of life in different parts of the city through experience and systematic research; and 4) saw and felt inequality through research and local internships in a low-income neighborhood.

Downtown Houston from Moody Park, Northside. Photo by Elizabeth Korver-Glenn.

Downtown Houston from Moody Park, Northside. Photo by Elizabeth Korver-Glenn.

Teaching Assistant

2015. Urban Systems; Rice University.

2013. Social Theory; Rice University.

Graduate Fellow and Undergraduate Mentor

2016. Hermann Park Conservancy and the Center for Civic Research and Design; Rice University.

2016. Southeast Houston Transformation Alliance and the Center for Civic Research and Design; Rice University.

2014. Southeast Houston Transformation Alliance and the Center for Civic Research and Design; Rice University.